A Short History of Home Video Game Consoles — Part 2

A Short History of Home Video Game Consoles — Part 2

A short history of video games

Kids nowadays are not used to playing outside with other kids. There is no fun in physical games or in playing football along with your best friends. In this ‘technology era’, the fun stands in video gaming, hoverboards, and smartphones. Even if this video gaming side has many flaws, it certainly has to have something good that it keeps attracting everyone. So why are these gadgets so enticing? The interest in computers and gaming has risen in the past years and we are seeing children mature so fast because of this virtual world we live in. It is a shame kid these days don’t know the beginning and the inner meaning of the video games they are playing today.

Fourth Generation

Sega
Sega

In 1988, Sega, the gaming giant launched their own console called Mega Drive. It was released in the US a year later and was known at that time as Sega Genesis. Nintendo wanted to increase their popularity so they created the Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES). Children from all around the world and especially North America were demanding more games and higher quality game consoles.

Fifth Generation

Atari
Atari

This generation was marked by the Atari Jaguar and 3DO which have come with plenty of new features. However, the 3DO was far more expensive than the SNES and Genesis combined together. The Jaguar was hardly programmable, so this ended in cutting both off. In December 1994, that Sony’s PlayStation was released in Japan and nine months later in North America. The PlayStation could have been a result of a business partnership between Sony and Nintendo to make a CD-based add-on for the SNES. But this has never happened and Nintendo decided to take another path. The PlayStation project launched by Sony marked the beginning of a new gaming era.

Sixth Generation

Sixth Generation Consoles

The sixth generation has seen a change in direction from consoles to PC or computer-like features. The companies had to adapt and create DVD media which promised to upgrade the gaming experience to a whole new level. This is how Sega’s Dreamcast, Sony PlayStation 2, and Microsoft XBox have been designed. There was experimentation with LAN type online console gaming and introductions of flash drives and hard drives for game data storage.

Seventh Generation

Controllers

This is an era of evolution and the most important features introduced in the past years are new disc formats — Blu-ray Disc and the HD DVD, the latter one getting discontinued soon. The use of motion as input, IR tracking (implemented on the Wii and demonstrated on the PS3), and standard wireless controllers were the highlights of this generation game consoles. This era included Microsoft’s XBox 360, Sony PlayStation 3, and Nintendo Wii, which are the most sold after consoles today.

Kids nowadays are not used to playing outside with other kids. There is no fun in physical games or in playing football along with your best friends. In this ‘technology era’, the fun stands in video gaming, hoverboards, and smartphones.